This is the second article in a three-part series that explores the notion of trust in today’s digital economy, and how organisations can practically build trust. In part 1 we took a deeper look at what trust means, and uncovered some guiding principles organisations can work towards when seeking to build trust.

In this piece, we look at best practice approaches to using regulatory compliance to build trust.

Privacy laws and regulatory guidance provide a pretty good framework for doing the right thing when it comes to trusted privacy practices (otherwise known as, the proper collection, use and disclosure of personal information).

We are the first to advocate for a compliance-based framework.  Every entity bound by the Privacy Act 1988 and equivalent laws should be taking proactive steps to establish and maintain internal practices, procedures and systems that ensure compliance with the Australian Privacy Principles.  They should be able to demonstrate appropriate accountabilities, governance and resourcing.

But compliance alone won’t build trust.

For one, the majority of Australian businesses are not bound by the Privacy Act because they fall under its $3m threshold. This is one of several reasons why Australian regulation is considered inadequate by EU data protection standards.

Secondly, there is variability in the ways that entities operationalise privacy. The regulator has published guidance and tooling for the public sector to help create some common benchmarks and uplift maturity recognising that some entities are applying the bare minimum. No such guidance exists for the private sector – yet.

Consumer expectations are also higher than the law. It may once have been acceptable for businesses to use and share data to suit their own purposes whilst burying their notices in screeds of legalise. However, the furore over Facebook Cambridge / Analytica shows that sentiment has changed (and also raises a whole bucket of governance issues).  Similarly, increasingly global consumers expect to be protected by the high standards set by the GDPR and other stringent frameworks wherever they are, which include rights such as the right to be forgotten and the right to data portability.

Lastly, current compliance frameworks do not help organisations to determine what is ethical when it comes to using and repurposing personal information. In short, an organisation can comply with the Privacy Act and still fall into an ethical hole with its data uses.

Your organisation should be thinking about its approach to building and protecting trust through privacy frameworks.  Start with compliance, then seek to bolster weak spots with an ethical framework; a statement of boundaries to which your organisation should adhere. 


In the third and final part of this series, we detail how an organisation’s approach to reputation management for privacy and cyber security issues can build or damage trust.


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