GDPR is here

If the recent flurry of emails from organisations sending privacy policy updates didn’t tip you off, the new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) commences today.

Reading every one of those emails (something even those of us in the privacy world struggle with), might give you the impression that there’s a standard approach to GDPR compliance. But the truth is that how your organisation has (hopefully) prepared for GDPR, and how it will continue to improve its privacy practices, is highly variable.

We’ve covered the GDPR at length on this blog, and a collection of links to our various articles is at the bottom of this post– but first, we’d like to set out a few thoughts on what the GDPR’s commencement means in practice.

Remember the principles

If the GDPR applies to your organisation, you’ve presumably taken steps to prepare for the requirements that apply under the new privacy regime. Among these are new requirements relating to data breach notification, as well as new rights and freedoms for individuals whose personal data you may be processing.

One aspect of GDPR that has received plenty of attention is the new penalties, which can be up to 4% of an organisation’s annual turnover, or 20 million Euros (whichever is greater). Certainly, those numbers have been very effective in scaring plenty of people, and they may cause you to check once again whether your organisation fully meets the new requirements under the GDPR.

However, the reality isn’t quite so straightforward (or scary). Much of the GDPR is principles-based, meaning that there isn’t always a single way to comply with the law – you need to take account of your organisation’s circumstances and the types of personal data it processes to understand where you stand in relation to GDPR’s requirements.

Although we don’t expect EU supervisory authorities to provide an enforcement ‘grace period’, we’re also of the view that enforcement activities will ramp up gradually. The authorities understand that, for many organisations, GDPR compliance is a journey. Those organisations that can demonstrate they’ve taken every reasonable step to prepare for GDPR, and which have a plan for continuing to improve their privacy compliance and risk programs, will be far better placed than those that have done little or nothing to get ready for the new law.

If your organisation still has work to do to comply with the GDPR, or you want to continue improving your organisation’s compliance and risk program (and there is always more to do!), there is plenty of help available to help you navigate GDPR and understand how it applies to your organisation.

Our previous coverage of the GDPR

Tim compares Australia’s Privacy Act with the GDPR

Melanie spoke to Bloomberg about driving competitive advantage from GDPR compliance

Head to Head: the GDPR and the Australian Privacy Principles (Part 1 and Part 2)

A Lesson in Data Privacy: You Can’t Cram for GDPR

Facebook and Cambridge Analytica: Would the GDPR have helped?

5 things you need to know about GDPR’s Data Protection Officer requirement

If you enjoyed this and would like to be notified or future elevenM blog posts, please subscribe below.

5 things you need to know about GDPR’s Data Protection Officer requirement

This article was originally published in issue #83 of Privacy Unbound under the title ‘5 Questions about DPOs’. Privacy Unbound is the journal of the International Association of Privacy Professionals, Australia-New Zealand (iappANZ).

1. What is a ‘DPO’, anyway? What are they even supposed to do?

In a nutshell, the Data Protection Officer (DPO) is a senior advisor with oversight of how your organisation handles personal data.

Specifically, DPOs should be able to:

  • inform and advise your organisation and staff about their privacy compliance obligations (with respect to the GDPR and other data protection laws)
  • monitor privacy compliance, which includes managing internal data protection activities, advising on data protection impact assessments, training staff and conducting internal audits
  • act as a first point of contact for regulators and individuals whose data you are handling (such as users, customers, staff… etc.) (Art. 39(1)).

2. But we’re not based in Europe, so do we even need one?

Well, even if you aren’t required to have one, you should have one. If you’re processing, managing or storing personal data about EU residents, you’ll need to comply with the requirements of the GDPR – this is one of those requirements, whether you’re based in the EU or not.

Specifically, the GDPR requires that you appoint a DPO in certain circumstances (Art. 37(1)).

These include if you carry out ‘large scale’ systematic monitoring of individuals (such as online behavioural tracking).

You’ll also need to appoint a DPO if you carry out ‘large scale processing of personal data’, including:

  • ‘special categories of data’ as set out in article 9 – that is, personal data that reveals racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs, trade union membership, genetic data, biometric identifiers, health information, or information about person’s sex life or sexual orientation.
  • data relating to criminal convictions and offences (per Art. 10).

The Article 29 Working Party has stated[1] that ‘large scale’ processing could include, for example, a hospital processing its patient data, a bank processing transactions, the analysis of online behavioural advertising data, or a telco processing the data required to provide phone or internet services.

Even if you don’t fit into one of these categories, you can still appoint a DPO in the spirit of best practice, and to ensure that your company is leading from the top when it comes to privacy.

In this respect, New Zealand is already ahead of the game. Entities covered by the New Zealand Privacy Act are already required to have a privacy officer, and they largely fulfil the same functions as a DPO.[2] However, they’ll still need to meet the other DPO requirements; see below.

While Australia hasn’t made having a privacy officer an express requirement for the private sector, the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner recommends that companies appoint a senior privacy officer as part of an effective privacy management framework.[3]

Government agencies aren’t off the hook

Being Public Service will not save you. Public authorities that collect the information of EU residents are also required to have a DPO (Art. 37(1)).

It’s worth noting that Australian Government agencies will need to appoint privacy officers and senior privacy ‘champions’ under the Australian Government Agencies Privacy Code,[4] which comes into force on 1 July 2018. Agency Privacy Champions may also be able to serve as the DPO.

As New Zealand Government agencies already have privacy officers, the only question they must answer is whether their privacy officer meets the other DPO requirements; see below.

3. OK, fine. We get it. We need a DPO. Who should we appoint?

The DPO needs to be someone that reports to the ‘highest management level’ of your organisation; that is, Board-level or Senior Executive (Art. 38(3)).

They’ll need to be suitably qualified, including having expert knowledge of the relevant data protection laws and practices (Art. 37(5)).

The DPO also needs to be independent; they can’t be directed to carry out their work as DPO in a certain way, or be penalised or fired for doing it (Art 38(3)). You’ll also need to ensure they’re appropriately resourced to do the work (Art. 38(2)).

If you’re a large organisation with multiple corporate subsidiaries, you can appoint a single DPO as long as they are easily accessible by each company (Art. 37(3)).

You can appoint one of your current staff as DPO (Art 37(6)), as long as their other work doesn’t conflict with their DPO responsibilities (Art. 38(6)). This means that you can’t have a DPO that works on anything that the DPO might be required to advise or intervene on. That is, they can’t also have operational responsibility for data handling. This means you can’t, for example, appoint your Chief Security Officer as your DPO.

4. But that means we can’t appoint any of our current staff. We can’t take on any new hires right now. Can we outsource this?

Yes, you can appoint an external DPO (Art 37(6)), but whoever you contract will still need to meet all of the above requirements.

Some smaller companies might not have enough work to justify a full-time DPO; an outsourced part-time DPO might be a good option for these organisations.

It might also be hard to find qualified DPOs, at least in the short term; IAPP has estimated that there will be a need for 28,000 DPOs in the EU.[5] A lot of companies in Australia and New Zealand are already having trouble finding qualified privacy staff, so some companies might have to share.

5. This all seems like a lot of trouble. Can we just wing it?

I mean, sure. If you really want to. But under the GDPR, failure to meet the DPO obligations may attract an administrative fine of up to €10 million, or up to 2% of your annual global turnover (Article 83(4)). Previous regulatory action in the EU on privacy issues has also gained substantial media attention. Is it really worth the risk? Especially given that, in the long run, having robust privacy practices will help you keep your users and your customers safe – having an effective DPO may well save you money.

[1] http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/newsroom/image/document/2016-51/wp243_annex_en_40856.pdf

[2] S23, Privacy Act 1993 (NZ); http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1993/0028/latest/DLM297074.html

[3] https://www.oaic.gov.au/agencies-and-organisations/guides/privacy-management-framework

[4] https://www.oaic.gov.au/privacy-law/privacy-registers/privacy-codes/privacy-australian-government-agencies-governance-app-code-2017

[5] https://iapp.org/news/a/study-at-least-28000-dpos-needed-to-meet-gdpr-requirements/

If you enjoyed this and would like to be notified or future elevenM blog posts, please subscribe below.

In Privacy Awareness Week, will Australia follow the GDPR?

Last week, the headlines told us that the senate backs GDPR style laws in Australia.

But what does this really mean in terms of the government’s commitment to reviewing privacy in Australia?

This does not (necessarily) mean the law will be reviewed

In short, it means very little.  The senate’s support of senator Jordon Steele-John’s notice of motion calling on the Government to consider the impact of our current privacy laws on Australians and look to the GDPR as a potential model for privacy protections for Australians holds no commitment as the senate cannot commit the government to action.

What it does signify is something very big and that is, a shift in the willingness of the senate to stand behind the Greens’ position that Australian privacy laws must be scrutinised.  Just two months ago, senator Steele-John put forward a very similar notice of motion and it was shut down, as were a couple of other privacy related motions.

Why did this one pass? (What has changed)

There are a few likely reasons why this one passed.  Putting aside matters of semantics and the politics of calling on government to subject itself to tighter scrutiny, (which was the case in motions no 749 and no 786), there is one material reason why this motion passed.

In the last two months, consumers have started to wake up to something we privacy professionals have worried about for a while – and that legal compliance is not enough and can, in fact, be damaging if ethical behaviours and transparent practices are perceived to be lacking.

There has been an enormous groundswell in Australia over the last two months, with both Facebook Cambridge Analytica and Commonwealth Bank blitzing the press with actions they have taken – or not taken – which although arguably lawful, have not met public perceptions of fairness and ethics.  Put simply, community expectations have surpassed legal standards.

So, senator Steele-John had his day, and time will tell whether this will serve as a prompt for government to call for a review of Australian privacy law in view of the GDPR.

There are plenty of other reasons why GDPR compliance makes sense, but we’ll leave that to a future blog.

Happy Privacy Awareness Week!

If you enjoyed this and would like to be notified or future elevenM blog posts, please subscribe below.